Is it legal to not pay your employees every2 weeks?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

Is it legal to not pay your employees every2 weeks?

The company I work for has continually not paid me every other Friday like they are suppose to when I agreed to that on the day of hire. I have yet to get paid for last Fridays check and I assume the company is going to close soon.

Asked on November 28, 2011 under Employment Labor Law, Florida

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

You don't indicate what state you are writing from: each state has different rules for how often employees must be paid (most make it twice a month or every two weeks, but there are exceptions). Therefore, what the company is required to do depends on your state's law--you may wish to repost your question with state-specific detail.

However, the above said--

1) Whatever payment schedule the company has adopted, it should follow--at least until/unless it provides notice, for the future, that it is changing its policy (subject to the law of its state, of course).

2) Employees must always be paid for work they performed--even if it is a little late for some unavoidable reason, it still must be paid.

At whatever point you believe you are not going to be paid, you may wish to consult with an attorney about a possible law suit, especially if the arrearage (what you're owed) is large. In the meantime, you could contact the state department of labor to see if you could file a complaint.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption