Is it legal for my employer to force me to drive 40 minutes/30 miles to undergo fingerprinting without paying me for my time and mileage?

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Is it legal for my employer to force me to drive 40 minutes/30 miles to undergo fingerprinting without paying me for my time and mileage?

Background: I have worked for this company for 1 1/2 years. They have recently gotten a contract with the IRS which requires this fingerprinting and extensive background check. My employer is balking at paying. We make minimum wage and the owner is looking at making big bucks from this contract; we employees will not get a raise only an increased workload.

Asked on August 27, 2011 Illinois

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

If you are required by your employer to travel to a location for work related activities that you are normally not compensated for in your salary package such as going to a location to undergo finger printing that benefits the employer, you are entitled to be compensated for the time to drive to this location, time to have your finger prints taken, time to drive back to work, and reimbursement for mileage, any tolls and parking.

You need to speak with the human resources department of your company about this if there is one. If there is no such department, you need to speak with your immediate supervisor.

If your employer still refuses to compensate and reimburse you for your time and expenses for being finger printed to benefit the company, you need to contact your local labor department about this.

Good luck.


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