is it illegal to tell co-worker/peers a minors mental health issues

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is it illegal to tell co-worker/peers a minors mental health issues

A minor who is suffering from mental illness/attempted suicide which led to 72 hr hold, her friend at time was aware of the mental issues. They had argument-now friend has told students at school and co-workerswork at same place about her mental illness without consent and has been spreading rumors around town. We asked school/work to look into issue, what legal ground does minor have in regards to mental health being released to others. We live in CA.

Asked on February 2, 2018 under Employment Labor Law, California

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

The minor has no options. A friend or anyone else who knows about your issues or history can disclose them to anyone he or she likes. There is no law preventing person A from revealing health history, physical or mental conditions, suicide attempts, etc. of person B to others. The laws that restrict disclose of this information are very restrictive and would not apply to the minor's friends: a health care provider cannot disclose this, for example, and an employer who is told by an employee about disabilities and medical conditions is limited in whom it can disclose them to (basically, to certain persons with a legitimate "need to know"), but none of those laws restrict a current or former friend.


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