Is it illegal to sell a car without a catalytic converter?

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Is it illegal to sell a car without a catalytic converter?

I bought a car 3 days ago and took it to the shop 2 days ago. The mechanic told me there was a pipe welded in place of the catalytic converter. Is there anyway that I can get my money back?

Asked on March 29, 2011 under General Practice, Indiana

Answers:

MD, Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

This is of course all depends on where you purchased your vehicle. If you purchased your motor vehicle from a retailer (car dealer), there are certain minimum warranties in place usually regarding used vehicles, which I assume this is in your situation. If so, contact your state's consumer protection bureau about this unfair and deceptive act. If you purchased this car "as is" and with cash (i.e., no loan) you may have less options than if you were to have purchased it brand new and under a loan contract. Further, there may be state laws in place regarding not street legal or unsafe motor vehicles. A catalytic converter involves emissions issues, so it may not be able to pass emissions tests without this converter. You should contact whomever sold you the vehicle and explain that there is a pipe instead of a catalytic converter and demand your money back. If you don't get it back (private party or retail seller), sue. Depending on the amount of the motor vehicle, you could sue in small claims court or civil court.


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