Is it illegal for an employer to refuse to assist employees with career development issues?

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Is it illegal for an employer to refuse to assist employees with career development issues?

For whatever odd reason I cannot advance in my career. I get these odd reasons none of which relate to the position requirements of being turned down. The latest was outright slander against me. This week I found that I was removed from the pool of applicants as there were too many people. They picked and chooses the “qualified” people themselves the rest were just out of luck.I have tried the corporate mentorship program but the mentor never responds.

Asked on May 12, 2012 under Employment Labor Law, Arizona

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

No, it is not illegal--employers have no legal responsibility whatsoever to their employees for their career development. Employers also have no responsibility to treat employees fairly or equally, with one exception: they may not discriminate on certain protected bases, such as (under federal law) due to an employee's race, religion, sex, disability, or age over 40. So if the treatment you complain of is motivated by illegal discrimimation, you may have a cause of action or grounds to file a complaint with the department of labor.

Note, though, that except for illegal, class- or group-based discrimination, your employer has no obligations to treat you fairly; it is free to promote others ahead of you, for example, simply because managers or supervisors like thoese people more.


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