Is it against labor laws for a company to not fix theA/C when it goes out?

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Is it against labor laws for a company to not fix theA/C when it goes out?

I work in a restaurant and the kitchen A/A has been out all summer. It stays about 100 to 105 in the kitchen during the day and at around 95 on the line where the food comes up. This is where I generally am all day for about 10 hours. They are very aware that it is not working, they even got an estimate but decided not to fix it. Is this legal?

Asked on July 30, 2011 Texas

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Many states have administrative agencies that oversee work conditions of ongoing businesses to make sure that the working conditions  for the employees are acceptable under current adminsistrative guidelines of a given state.

California has "Cal-Osha" for this.

You might ask your supervisor about what can be done about the very hot conditions in the kitchen as it affects your ability to do your work well.

If there is no adequate response to your inquiry, you might consider contacting the administrative agency in your state in charge of overseeing safe working conditions for workers. It is not fair for anyone to be working in conditions that are deemed substandard. That is how accidents happen.

Good luck.

 

 

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Many states have administrative agencies that oversee work conditions of ongoing businesses to make sure that the working conditions  for the employees are acceptable under current adminsistrative guidelines of a given state.

California has "Cal-Osha" for this.

You might ask your supervisor about what can be done about the very hot conditions in the kitchen as it affects your ability to do your work well.

If there is no adequate response to your inquiry, you might consider contacting the administrative agency in your state in charge of overseeing safe working conditions for workers. It is not fair for anyone to be working in conditions that are deemed substandard. That is how accidents happen.

Good luck.

 

 


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