is copies of arrest records sufficient for form i-175?

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is copies of arrest records sufficient for form i-175?

I have been arrested in the past and when I first applied for U.S. residence through marriage I was asked to provide original or court-certified copy of the complete arrest record and/or disposition for each incident, in which I did receive from the courts and sent in my package. 2 years later I’m asked for the same thing for form I-175, I have copies of the originals from 2 years ago. is that sufficient? Also, I’m being asked for the joint tax returns with my spouse. Though I know this question may seem unnecessary I must ask knowing how strict USCIS can be. Is form 1040 sufficient or do they need every single page of the return? Last year, my full tax return was over 100 pages. Lastly, since my marriage was deemed to be entered in good faith after my initial interview, is it necessary to provide evidence ie. photos, phone logs, bills, etc. from the very beginning of the marriage or is just the past 2 years that I was granted residency acceptable?

Asked on December 19, 2018 under Immigration Law, California

Answers:

SB Member California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

Yes yes and yes.  Provide everything even if you have previously provided it already.  For the removal of conditional status, provide everything for the previous 2 years since you got the green card.  The tax return must be a complete copy of the federal tax return, including all schedules and attachments.  Good faith evidence needs to be provided for the 2 years since obtaining a green card.  The more you submit the less likely you will be called in for an interview although you might still be interviewed because of the arrest.  But it is better to submit as much evidence as possible so that there are no additional requests for evidence.


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