Hurricane Fraud Attorney Says Insurance Companies Should Focus On Repairing Homes

Litigation over whether wind or flood was responsible for the damage to homes continues long after Hurricanes Rita, Wilma and Katrina ended. R. Jason Richards, a Florida attorney whose firm represents victims of hurricane fraud and bad faith insurance practices, says that at the end of the day, it’s about being able to repair the damage to your house, and an attorney can help in that process when your insurance company doesn’t do right by you.

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Hurricane Fraud and Insurance Claim Denials

When your home has been severely damaged or destroyed in a hurricane, the last thing you need is your insurance company denying or delaying your valid claim. Unfortunately, that’s what happened in thousands of cases after Hurricanes Wilma, Rita and Katrina, and lawyers say that many of those turned out to be situations of bad faith insurance or hurricane fraud. But, what is it and what remedies are available to victims?

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Hurricane Insurance Fraud: Understanding Wind Vs. Flood Damage & How FEMA Works

Hurricanes generally involve both wind and flood damage to a structure. However, coverage for flood, or water, damage is a separate form of insurance obtained from FEMA and wind damage is covered under most homeowners insurance policies. Understanding how the different coverages work can be extremely complicated for policyholders, and an provides an opportunity for insurers to engage in bad faith insurance practices or hurricane fraud.

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Many Insurers Still Haven’t Settled Hurricane Ike Claims

Although it’s been a year since Hurricane Ike devastated parts of Texas, caused nearly $24 billion worth or damage and claimed 82 deaths, many homeowners’ insurance companies have yet to settle claims with their policyholders, which has led to bad faith insurance claims and breach of contract claims.

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Hurricane Fraud: What Are Storm Chasers & Why Should You Avoid Them?

A hurricane hits and damages not only your house, but thousands of others in the same area and there are simply not enough contractors to go around. Enter the storm chaser. Rolling in and out of town like a tumbleweed, he’ll fix your home quickly and perhaps cheaply, but probably not correctly as he’s not likely to be licensed or bonded. Hurricane insurance fraud lawyers say homeowners should always stick with local contractors.

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