Insurance Claims: Typical Bad Faith Insurance Lawsuits and Awards

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

Jeffrey Johnson is a legal writer with a focus on personal injury. He has worked on personal injury and sovereign immunity litigation in addition to experience in family, estate, and criminal law. He earned a J.D. from the University of Baltimore and has worked in legal offices and non-profits in Maryland, Texas, and North Carolina. He has also earned an MFA in screenwriting from Chapman Univer...

Full Bio →

Written by

UPDATED: Jun 19, 2018

Advertiser Disclosure

It’s all about you. We want to help you make the right legal decisions.

We strive to help you make confident insurance and legal decisions. Finding trusted and reliable insurance quotes and legal advice should be easy. This doesn’t influence our content. Our opinions are our own.

Editorial Guidelines: We are a free online resource for anyone interested in learning more about legal topics and insurance. Our goal is to be an objective, third-party resource for everything legal and insurance related. We update our site regularly, and all content is reviewed by experts.

When you file an insurance claim with an insurance company, by law, in any state, that company owes you a duty to act in good faith. Simply put, this means that the insurance company must not look for ways to escape its obligation to investigate the claim or to pay you. Doing so would constitute bad faith. Bad faith claims and lawsuits may stem from one or more of a number of actions or inactions by the insurance company from denial of coverage to failure to negotiate a settlement. Here are some of the typical reasons insurance companies get sued for bad faith:

  • Unwarranted denial of coverage
  • Failure to communicate pertinent information to the claimant
  • Failure to conduct a reasonable investigation of the claim
  • Refusal to pay the claim without investigating
  • Failure to deny or pay the claim within a reasonable period of time
  • Failure to confirm or deny coverage within a reasonable period of time
  • Failure to attempt to come to a fair and reasonable settlement when liability is clear
  • Offering substantially less money to settle than the true value of the claim
  • Failure to promptly provide a reasonable explanation for denial of a claim
  • Failure to enter into any negotiations for settlement of the claim
  • Failure to respond to a time-limit demand
  • Failure to disclose policy limits

Bad faith litigation can take many different forms and will, like the underlying cases they stem from, either result in a settlement with the insurance company, an arbitration decision, or a verdict one way or the other. Here are some different types of cases and their outcomes. Keep in mind that the cases presented here are for illustrative purposes only. Each case is unique, including yours, and no one case will have exactly the same result as another.

Boicourt v. Amex Assurance Co.

Award: $2,006,000

A boy severely injured in a vehicle accident settled for more than $2 million pursuant to a policy that provided only $100,000 in coverage, because the insurance carrier initially refused, in bad faith, to disclose the policy limits.

Matson Terminals v. Home Insurance Co

Settlement: $33.65 million

Home Insurance Company denied coverage for a $10 million earthquake claim, and a California jury concluded the denial, based on a policy exclusion, was in bad faith. The jury awarded $11,000,000 in punitive damages. The appeals court, in affirming the award that included $23.5 million in compensatory damages, held that the insurer led the policyholder to believe there was coverage, and encouraged it to initiate repairs.

David Clayton v. United Services Automobile Association

Award: $3.9 million

A California jury found the insurance company’s offer of $10,000 on policy limits of $300,000 to parents whose only child was killed in an auto accident was unreasonable and in bad faith. An appellate panel affirmed the award. The California Supreme Court denied review of the case.

Vann v. The Travelers Insurance Company

Award: $26.5 million

The former owner of an auto repair shop was asked to vacate the premises after his landlord died. Following, he was sued for causing environmental damage on the property. He asked his insurance company to provide him with a defense. First they denied he had a policy, and then, after admitting such a policy existed, they inundated him with burdensome and harassing requests for information with which he could not comply. After denial of the claim, Mr. Vann sued for bad faith and the jury agreed. The Travelers’ appeals all the way up to the U.S. Supreme Court were unsuccessful.

For a no-cost, no-obligation evaluation of your case, fill out our free case evaluation form and an experienced attorney will contact you. Our Insurance Advice site has links for all state departments of insurance.

For more information about bad faith insurance practices and claims, see the following articles:

How to File a Complaint with Your State Department of Insurance

Insurance Claims: How an Insurance Bad Faith Attorney Can Help

Don’t Be Afraid of the Big, Bad Insurance Company!

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption