In WV, can an employer designate specific parking spots for those employees with a Handicapped Placard?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

In WV, can an employer designate specific parking spots for those employees with a Handicapped Placard?

At work there are some dumpsters by the back door and there are a few parking spots marked off that are for employees with handicapped placards to use. Forever, we always squeezed 5 or 6 vehicles in this space. The other day the new lead security guard came to me and told me that I am not to park there unless I am parked in a

Asked on August 29, 2018 under Employment Labor Law, West Virginia

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

Can an employer designate certain spots for handicapped parking yes? Anyone who controls a parking lot is free to designate different areas for handicapped parking, for employee parking, for guest/visitor parking, etc. 
However, the above said, employers MUST make "reasonable accommodations" to employee disability--which can include in terms of parking. If an employee can do his/her job but needs to park closer to the building, the employer should allow them to do so; the courtesy coach might be a reasonable accommodation if it ran often or quickly enough so that you could get work on time, but since that does appear to the case, they should allow you to park closer. 
You could contact the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), which enforces the anti-discrimination laws (including anti-disbility-based discrimination) to file a complaint if they will not give you parking which works for you, given your disability(ies).


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption