In the state of Ohio, do non-compete agreements apply to temporary part-time employees?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

In the state of Ohio, do non-compete agreements apply to temporary part-time employees?

I have a temporary part-time position with a specialized company in Columbus,
Ohio with uses my specialized Masters degree. At the time of hire, I was told
that the position was temporary part-time, however if I preformed well it could
become a permanent full time position. I have operated in good faith, working
very hard with the understanding that the position can evolve into a full time
position. I have recently discovered that regardless of how hard I work, the
company never had any intention of offering a full time position. I was required
at time of hire to sign a non-compete agreement that requires me to stay out of
my field for a year. I signed because I believed the position could become full
time employment. Does my signature prevent me from applying to the handful of
similar companies in the city?

Asked on July 25, 2017 under Employment Labor Law, Ohio

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

Yes, if you signed a non-competition agreement, you are bound by its terms if you quit or resign. (If you are terminated, then unless you received something in addition to employment for the agreement, like a signing bonus or stock, they should not be able to enforce it against you.) For this purpose, the law does not draw a distinction between full- and part-time, or temporary or permanent; all that matters is you agreed to it.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption