In PA, is an employer required to pay me to drive their vehicle to a jobsite?

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In PA, is an employer required to pay me to drive their vehicle to a jobsite?

Often, I am required to travel 2 hours or more away from home for work. I drive their vehicle hauling their tools and sometimes materials. It seems I should be compensated for this. Also, I wonder if Workers Comp covers my lost wages and medical expenses if I should be involved in a traffic accident and hurt.

Asked on June 26, 2009 under Employment Labor Law, Pennsylvania

Answers:

J.V., Member, New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

To answer your question the first question regarding compensation for travel time is generally answered in the negative. Although some employers pay for travel time and or expense it is not required. The decision to cover costs for travel is determined on a case by case basis. I suggest you refer to your employment contract. That may set forth the terms of employment. However it is discretionary as to how to handle travel and the employer may simply not pay for such time.

As for injury if your injured while in a company vehicle going to work again whether your covered would be dependent on how the injury is perceived. People are not subject to workers comp if injured while travelling to and from work. However because your in a company vehicle it may help build a case that your entiteld to such coverage.

Unfortunately both of your questions don't have black and white answers. One suggestion I would make it calling a local employment lawyer. They will know how these situations are generally handled in your area and may have a suggestion or two as to how you can possible get paid for your time and also possible ways to ensure your injuries would be covered. If you need further clarification please feel free to post again and good luck.


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