How much can a landlord charge for a pet deposit?

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How much can a landlord charge for a pet deposit?

I live in a mobile home park and I own my home. My landlord says that he can charge us a $300 deposit per pet using MN statute 327c. I looked it up and it says that he can only charge $4 per pet a month.

Asked on November 26, 2010 under Real Estate Law, Minnesota

Answers:

MD, Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

You are not in a typical rental situation because with apartments, yes since you don't own the physical living premises, you can be charged from 100 to some even charge a thousand dollars for pet deposits, depending on the type and number of animals. You only rent the land but you own the physical premises wherein the animals reside.  Every state that has a mobile home park or allows them has certain statutes covering mobile homes and mobile home parks.  Usually the attorney general in that state is the agency who handles disputes regarding such matters or investigations into criminal activity or activity that could be considered a violation of your consumer protection laws in Minnesota. Park owners and managers oftentimes have to worry about health regulations so perhaps the deposit has to do with that but it may be misguided because the Minnesota Attorney General's statutory history indicates a maximum amount of $4.00 can only be charged.


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