If you have a warrant, can you still travel to another state for a week or will you be arrested?

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If you have a warrant, can you still travel to another state for a week or will you be arrested?

The warrant is for a misdemeanor, and is only because I missed a few of my court issued classes. Do you think I would be able to take a one-week trip with family if I am back before my court date that they set, or will I be arrested/not able to board the flight at the airport? I have my ticket, itinerary, everything , this was before I knew I’d have a warrant.

Asked on May 2, 2015 under Criminal Law, California

Answers:

B.H.F., Member, Texas State Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 6 years ago | Contributor

The best answer is maybe.  When you go through security, they may do a check and see that you have a warrant.  They won't care what it's for or why it's issued-- all they will know is that it is a warrant and they have a duty to act of it once they know about.  There is a possibility that nothing will happen and that they will not run your history because you are just going between states, not a port of entry from another country.... but just know it's still possible.

If they do let you board and you go to the vacation state, you could be arrested there during a routine situation, like a traffic stop.  However, because it's a misdemeanor, many states have a policy of do not arrest because many originating states won't pay the costs to expedite someone for a misdemeanor.

On a similar note, if you are already on bond and your bond does not restrict your travel, then travel is not an issue.  If you have a condition of your bond or probation that you not travel out of state, then don't risk another violation.  Cancel the plans.  You don't want to give the judge an extra reason to be aggravated at you.

If you have an attorney, it would really just be better to resolve the warrant issue before you go.  That way you can enjoy the trip without feeling like your about to be a fugitive.


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