If you had a warrent for your arrest outside of California could you work in Oregon without getting arrested?

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If you had a warrent for your arrest outside of California could you work in Oregon without getting arrested?

Asked on May 20, 2009 under Criminal Law, Oregon

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 12 years ago | Contributor

You must also remember that in applying for a job a criminal background check could be done.  If it is done than this warrant will show up.  Then not only will you lose the job but someone there could turn you in.  You really need to deal with this as soon as possible.

If it was for something minor and happened years ago this might be handled as nothing more than an administrative matter.  For something more serious and recent it could much more than that. But either way you will sooner or later have to deal with this.  Warrants don't expire.

Call an attorney in the area where the warrant was issued and discuss things with him.  It will go better for you if you go in voluntarily as opposed to getting caught.

J.M.A., Member in Good Standing of the Connecticut Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 12 years ago | Contributor

The fact that you have warrant out for your arrest in CA means that you could be arrested at anytime if stopped by a police officer who runs your record and sees you have an outstanding warrant.  The warrant does not prevent you from working, but if you are arrested, you will be taken back to CA to be prosecuted.  I would get the job and then deal with the matter in CA.  Depending on how serious the charges, you should hire a lawyer to help investigate the charge and deal with it. You do not want to be arrested at your new job.


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