If my employer abruptly stopped paying for housing that it agreed it would pay for, what are my options?

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If my employer abruptly stopped paying for housing that it agreed it would pay for, what are my options?

I was living in ID and working for a company. They asked me to start a job in WA as the foreman. I agreed to this. The job was a prevailing wage job. Between my project manager, the general manager and myself we came to the conclusion that I should move to WAfor the duration of the job. I did. At first they paid for my housing by way of reimbursement. Then they just stopped.Apparently they felt the job wasn’t making any money. I’m 3 months in and almost $3600 in the hole for housing. Can the company do this?

Asked on July 27, 2011 Washington

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Well they can certainly try.  But I really think that you should consult with an attorney in your area.  You and your employer had a contract (and I hope that you have now learned that it is best to get things in writing before you agree to do something as big as move to the West Coast) and they have breached a term.  Being an oral agreement you are going to have to prove it through testimony and actions.  Please keep sending your paid rent bill to them every month with a letter that says: pursuant to our agreement enclosed please find my paid rent receipt for the month of  whatever.  Please forward reimbursement immediately.   Let them keep rejecting it or not sending it.  You need to establish that they did in fact agree to it and you have with the first three months.  Understand that you may have to sue them.  Good luck.


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