If I work over 96 hours a week but don’t get paid overtime, is that wrong?

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If I work over 96 hours a week but don’t get paid overtime, is that wrong?

Asked on January 20, 2013 under Employment Labor Law, California

Answers:

Tricia Dwyer / Tricia Dwyer Esq & Associates PLLC

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

In general, the Minnesota Fair Labor Standards Act requires employers to pay overtime for all hours worked in excess of 48 per work week, unless the employee is specifically exempt under Minnesota Statutes 177.23, subdivision 7.

The Federal Fair Labor Standards Act requires certain employers to pay overtime for all hours worked in excess of 40 per work week. These employers include:

·         employers that produce or handle goods for interstate commerce;

·         businesses with gross annual sales of more than $500,000;

·         businesses that were covered before April 1, 1990, under the $250,000 ($362,500 retail and services) dollar volume test; and

·         hospitals and nursing homes, private and public schools, federal, state and local government agencies.

If this situation occurs in Minnesota, I urge you to seek private legal counsel from a qualified Minnesota attorney and I recommend that you make several phone calls to attorneys in choosing because it is important that you feel a sense of great trust and confidence with the attorney-client relationship.  Take care.


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