If I were to have a boxing tournament on my property and had my fighters sign a waiver saying that I’m not responsible for their injuries, would this be legal?

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If I were to have a boxing tournament on my property and had my fighters sign a waiver saying that I’m not responsible for their injuries, would this be legal?

Would I just need a signature to make the waiver legitimate or does a lawyer need to be involved?

Asked on March 19, 2015 under Personal Injury, Kansas

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 6 years ago | Contributor

Very dangersous. Waivers do not provide absolute protection; at best, they provide protection from the normal risks of a sport, *provided* that you provide the normal, expected level of safety. That is, if a fighter is injured because the surface of your ring is is not good or appropriate; or because you (or whomever is officiating) did not step in promptly to stop the fight if one fighter is getting hurt; or because you allowed too much of a mismatch in weight classes or didnt't inspect gloves properly; or if you didnt' have medical care on stand-by; etc.--if anything like that happens, which would not happen at an "official," regulated match, you could be liable despite the waivers. And if you were liable, it's almost a given that your homeowner's insurance would not cover the loss/costs, since regular homeowners does not cover sporting events on the property.


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