If I took some merchandise valued under $50 from a retail store and left the store after giving the merchandise back to loss prevention, can I still be charged?

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If I took some merchandise valued under $50 from a retail store and left the store after giving the merchandise back to loss prevention, can I still be charged?

They know my name but I was actually working for another company(inventory company) when I took the merchandise and left before they called the police, if they did. My employer(the inventory company) has not contacted me and I have not heard anything back from them yet after trying to contact my employer. I have called the store I was accuse the merchandise from and they haven’t filed any charges as of yet because when I called to ask what they were going to do they said “they were in the process of investigation and already knew my name and asked for my address”. I hung up then.

Asked on March 5, 2014 under Criminal Law, North Carolina

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 6 years ago | Contributor

In common usage, theft is the taking of another person's property without that person's permission or consent with the intent to deprive the rightful owner of it. The word is also used as an informal shorthand term for some crimes against property, such as burglary, embezzlement, larceny, looting, robbery, shoplifting, library theft and fraud. In some jurisdictions, theft is considered to be synonymous with larceny; in others, theft has replaced larceny. Someone who carries out an act of or makes a career of theft is known as a thief. The act of theft is known by terms such as stealing, thieving, wicksing, and filching.

Answer: Yes, you can still be charged for the perceived theft that you admitted doing. I suggest that you conult with a criminal defense attorney in your locality to assist you. One can be found on attorneypages.com.


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