If I rent a hotel room for 10 days and refuse maid service, does the hotel have the right to inspect the room without notice?

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If I rent a hotel room for 10 days and refuse maid service, does the hotel have the right to inspect the room without notice?

I occupied a hotel room for 10 days. After the third day they came in and cleaned the room. They proceeded to place my clothing in drawers, in the process an item of mine that belonged to a dead relative was dumped and tweaked. They informed me they have the right to perform maintenance and cleaning after the third day, if I refused maid service or not without notice. This took place in IA and he told me state law that allows this. Is this true?

Asked on August 4, 2011 Iowa

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

You first need to read the registration papers for the hotel room that you signed when you first registered. Its terms set forth the obigations owed to you by the hotel and vice versa and control unless in violation of state law where the hotel is located.

Under the laws of most states, the hotel has the right to inspect rooms that are being occupied by customers without notice for safety reasons.The safety of the occupant of the room is a consideration as well as the safety of its other guests. The hotel management on these inspections are required to knock and wait for a reasonable response time. If no response is given to the room, the pass key is used for entry.

As to the item of a deceased relative that was thrown away by cleaning, you should advise management of what happened and ask for compesation for he discarded item.


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