If I plead guilty to speeding, does that admit guilt on a possible endangerment charge that they also charged me with but haven’t proceeded with?

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If I plead guilty to speeding, does that admit guilt on a possible endangerment charge that they also charged me with but haven’t proceeded with?

I was arrested for endangerment and speeding while riding on my motorcycle with my GF riding as a passenger. They took me to jail and charged me with endangementand speeding. I went to my follow up court date, and they advised that they were not being picked up by the district attorney at this time. After a few more speeding tickets I was served court paperwork to appear in court for the speeding ticket I received the night I went to jail for for speeding /endangerment. So they had advised me that theyg have up to 7 years to file charges and proceed with the endangerment felony. If I take a guilty plea to the speeding ticket, does that possible hurt me if the state ever attempts to pursue the endangerment charge that also came with in the same event as I’m possibly admitting guilt to on the speeding ticket?

Asked on July 25, 2017 under General Practice, Arizona

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

It does not automatically prove you committed the endangerment, but a guilty plea IS a sworn admission of guilt to the offense to which you plead--i.e. it is sworn admission that you were speeding. While you can speed without commiting endangerment, clearly, speeding makes it more likely you were driving dangerously. So the plea could be used as evidence against you, to support the case that you did this.


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