Jeffrey Johnson is a legal writer with a focus on personal injury. He has worked on personal injury and sovereign immunity litigation in addition to experience in family, estate, and criminal law. He earned a J.D. from the University of Baltimore and has worked in legal offices and non-profits in Maryland, Texas, and North Carolina. He has also earned an MFA in screenwriting from Chapman Univer...

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UPDATED: Dec 13, 2019

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As a general matter, you should pay any property tax owed before the due date, even if you intend to file a property tax appeal. Failure to pay the proper amount of taxes can result in interest, fees, and penalties being assessed. Non-payment of any portion of your property tax can even put your home at risk.

The amount of money you have to pay in property taxes is based on the percentage set by your local government and on the assessed value of the worth of your property. Your property is also periodically re-assessed at intervals determined by the government in order to determine whether its value has changed. This means your property tax liability can increase or decrease from time to time. If you find that you do not like the amount that is posted on your tax bill, you do have an option to appeal, but you are still going to need to pay the property tax bill in the meantime to avoid problems.

The rules governing the process of property tax appeal depend on your jurisdiction’s local government, and can vary from state to state. However, in general, when you file for a property tax appeal, you’re actually filing an appeal against the value assessment that has been assigned to your property. Although you have the right to appeal, you may not get to choose the manner in which you do. In any case, when you file for an appeal on the amount of property taxes assigned to you, be sure to carefully research the rules regarding your tax obligation beforehand.

Depending on the tax regulations in your area, you may or may not be successful in your appeal. If you are successful and you overpaid, you can always get a refund back. If you have further questions concerning property tax appeals or need advice on your specific case, consult with a lawyer who understands the property tax appeals process.