If I have sole custody, what are my rights to allowing my children to see their father?

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If I have sole custody, what are my rights to allowing my children to see their father?

I have suspicions about my ex husbands well being. If I do not feel comfortable with my kids visiting him, what are my rights? It states that if I withhold ,my kids from seeing him, I can be held contempt. Example – Our son has been on an antibiotic for 3 weeks for an infected tooth that needs to be extracted and his appointment is scheduled. The label was coming off of the amoxicillin and was sticky so I removed it. Since the medicine did not have a label on it, he would not administer him his medicine this past weekend, stating that he did not feel comfortable giving him a dose with no instructions. I sent him the information from the pharmacy and he still would not give it to him. He is very manipulating and text/emails me all day everyday. We are not to communicate unless it is about the kids health information, drop off or pick up, school related information. I have message after message after message of him asking me to have the kids call over and over and over, during his ‘talk time’ He can talk to them get off the phone then text me afterwards to have them call him back, again and again. My last attorney blew my suspicions and concerns off as though I can’t really do much but my mother instincts is telling me a different story. My ex-husband was verbally, mentally and physically abusive during our relationship.

Asked on October 23, 2018 under Family Law, South Carolina

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

So the best thing that you can do now is to keep a diary of everything that is going on. If he is continually harrassing you and violating the agreement or in any way putting the kids in harms way (not administering the anitbiotic) then you need to build a case to modify the agreement you have.  The agreement is a contract and you need to abide by it unles you can prove that doing so is not in the "best interests of your children." Start making your case.  Undertand, though, that it needs to be strong and that the court will not act unless his actions amount to egregious activity.  Good luck.


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