If I have a charge but am hoping to ask the judge for leniency or hope he dismisses the charge summons offense, how do I plead on the mail in citation?

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If I have a charge but am hoping to ask the judge for leniency or hope he dismisses the charge summons offense, how do I plead on the mail in citation?

So I got 3 charges. Public drunkenness, disorderly conduct and theft of minor services (A1). I’m not a thief. I never steal. But this night, I apparently ordered $14 worth of food and had no money and tried to convince the employees to let me have it for free (uh-huh). I’m willing to accept that I was a) drunk and b) disorderly but I’m hoping to convince the judge that the act of “theft” was merely a byproduct of my drunken idiocy. How should I plead on the send-in portion of my citation? Also, doesn’t “drunk in public” and “disorderly” generally go hand in hand?

Asked on August 28, 2012 under Criminal Law, Pennsylvania

Answers:

Andrew Goldberg

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

You have to enter a plea of "not guilty" and ask for a Hearing. Disorderly conduct is a summary offense and the max. fine is $300. Typically, it is loud, obnoxious, offensive behavior such as using profanities or obscene language. Public drunkenness is also a summary  offense with a max. fine of $300. Typically, it is being  and acting drunk in a public place and so drunk that your are a danger tyo yourself or other persons. For example, if you are so drunk that you are staggering and fall down (i.e., a danger, therefore, to yourself ).


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