If I ask to go part-time in order so thatI can go back to school part-time, can my employer fire me?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

If I ask to go part-time in order so thatI can go back to school part-time, can my employer fire me?

I work in federal assisted housing through HUD for elderly and disabled people. I was promised a certification that the company would pay for and after a year of working here it has not happened yet. I want to go back to school for para-legal studies, and want to work part-time, while in school. I was hired full-time but most the time I am sitting here with nothing to do, I could do the same job part time. I really just want to make sure I will still have a job if I ask to go part-time.

Asked on August 29, 2011 Kentucky

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

An employer is under no obligation to allow someone to change their status from full time to part time--even if it's for a good reason (e.g. to go to school) or the person doesn't have full  time work. So yes, unless you have an employment contract protecting your right to work or limiting the grounds for firing you, you could be fired if you ask for this; of course, if you don't have an employment contract, you could most likely be fired more or less at any time, if the employer wants to (such as if they decide they don't need you or your position).

Have you considered trying to go to school at night? Or a weekend program (there are some, to accomodate people with full-time jobs)? Or an internet/online/distance learning program? Even though it would be alot of work, to pursue a degree while working full time, if you're fortunate enough to have a not-too-demanding full time job, you   may wish to keep it while going to school in your off hours. If you ever do get fired or have your hours cut back, then you can always increase your attendence.

 


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption