If an employer asks your opinion, and you give them your opinion, can they fire you if they don’t like your answer?

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If an employer asks your opinion, and you give them your opinion, can they fire you if they don’t like your answer?

My employer recently asked us to participate in general scenarios regarding business ethics. The most recent topic was regarding posters in the office that depict 9 good business ethics refrain from gossiping was 1 of the 9. My employer then asked to email our opinion about what stood out the most and why. I wrote back regarding gossiping and how the office is a giant cesspool of gossip cliques. I also wrote that because of these cliques, people tend to mix business w/personal, and that’s how the gossip network starts. I concluded that we’re here to work and produce, not gossip and dive into each other’s personal lives.

With that being said, does my employer have grounds to terminate me? I understand my employer is an ‘at will’ employer, but they asked me my opinion, so I gave it to them.

Any input would be greatly appreciated, thanks.

Asked on October 18, 2018 under Employment Labor Law, California

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

In an "at will" work relationship, an employee can be fired for any reason or no reason at all, with or without notice. This is true even in your situation, where you were asked for your opinion. Accordingly, unless  you have protection under the terms of a union agreemnt or employment contract, you can be legally terminated. 


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