If an 11 year-old juvenile offender is court ordered 50 hours community service, does hisPO have right to make him work 100 hours?

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If an 11 year-old juvenile offender is court ordered 50 hours community service, does hisPO have right to make him work 100 hours?

My son is on a consent decree. He was ordered 50 hours of community service. He was involved in a fight and during which time given 10 days out of school suspension. His probation officer demanded he work 5 hours community service with his office each of those days and said those hours will not count towards the hours that were court ordered. In addition, he put him on 30 days house arrest, and said he is not allowed to participate in football.

Asked on October 14, 2010 under Criminal Law, Pennsylvania

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

You need to get legal help as soon as you can.  A probation officer can not modify a sentence given by the judge to such a degree as you have explained here.  Sure, they have some latitude with the guidelines but this probation officer sounds like he has something personal out for your son, so I would make an application to have him removed and your son reassigned to a different officer.  Get a copy of his sentence from the clerk of the court and bring it with you to the attorney. In the meantime, do not cross the PO and abide by his rules.  You do not need him starting any more trouble for your son.  Good luck.


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