If your charges are reduced after you bond out with a bail bondsman does your bond decrease to your current charges?

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If your charges are reduced after you bond out with a bail bondsman does your bond decrease to your current charges?

For example, if a person was charged with aggravated assault and after they bonded out the charges were changed to terroristic threat to a household member.Also. does the bail bondsman have to return any money to you?

Asked on April 14, 2012 under Bankruptcy Law, Texas

Answers:

B.H.F., Member, Texas State Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

The bondsman bonded you for a specific charge, which would include any lesser included offenses.  Even if the charges are completely dropped after you are bonded, they are not required to return the money because their contract agreement was for you to pay a sum and for them to front the money for you to get out of jail.  Once that event happens, the deal is done.  As far as the part of your question about the bond being lowered--- after a person is arrested and charged, the bond carries forward so that they don't have to be rearrested after the information or indictment is filed.  The bond does not automatically lower.  However, if cannot afford your current bond, you can petition the court to see if they will lower the bond, since it's now a lower charge.  Some courts will lower it and based on that, some bondsmen will charge you a lower monthly fee after the reduction.


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