If a person contracted with the previous owner of a property that they can reside there for the remainder of their life but the property changes hands, do they still retain that right?

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If a person contracted with the previous owner of a property that they can reside there for the remainder of their life but the property changes hands, do they still retain that right?

My friend’s mother owns a mobile home which sits on a lot which previously belonged to her daughter and son-in-law. They sold their house to another party and drew up a contract with the man who purchased the property that their mother could keep her mobile home on the lot for the remainder of her lifetime. She lived in the mobile home until recently. She has been staying with her daughter to help her daughter through an illness. Her son is living in the mobile home and she plans to return home when she is able. And, the man who bought the property and signed the contract has given the property to his daughter, who is taking my friend’s mother to court to try and force her to move her mobile home. What are her rights in this matter?

Asked on April 16, 2018 under Real Estate Law, Tennessee

Answers:

S.L,. Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

Your friend's mother has a life estate which means she can live in the mobile home for life on the property where it is located.  
The fact that the owner of the property transferred the property  to his daughter does NOT override or end the life estate.  Your friend's mother has the right to continue living in the mobile home on the property where the mobile home is located for the remainder of her life. 


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