Ifmy landlord does not include interest when they returnmy deposit, can they use wear and tear damage to a dishwasher as an excuse not to pay it?

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Ifmy landlord does not include interest when they returnmy deposit, can they use wear and tear damage to a dishwasher as an excuse not to pay it?

About 30 days after I moved out my landlord sent me a check for my security deposit and $30 towards my water bill that we agreed on since workers were using the water power washing the house. When we did the walk-through they brought up the hinge on the dishwasher door being loose. We said it was normal wear and tear. They said they would get back to us. A month later we got the check for the deposit and water bill. Nothing said they were holding any money. Now that I asked for the interest they said they will send a receipt for the dishwasher and see from there if they owe us any money.

Asked on August 6, 2011 Maryland

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Whether or not your landlord owes you accrued interest on your security deposit depends upon 1. whether your written lease agreement provides for its payment to you at the end of the lease and 2. does your state, county of residence or town/city of residence mandate that security deposits for a rental accrue interest.

If you are entitled to accrued interest upon your security deposit when you leave your former rental, you are entitled to it from the landlord. The landlord agreed that the problem with the dishwasher was the result of normal use. You are entitled to your accrued interest in full.

Write your landlord a letter (keeping a copy for future reference) reciting what was agreed upon as to the dishwasher requesting the accrued interest on your security deposit by a set date. If you do not receive it by then, small claims court is your option.

Good luck.


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