What to do if I work for a non-profit organization and my boss is using intimidating tactics to try and get me to quit?

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What to do if I work for a non-profit organization and my boss is using intimidating tactics to try and get me to quit?

He has one of my co-workers as a witness when he discusses my review of my mork methods. They have also been commenting on the frequency of my bowel movements.

Asked on November 19, 2012 under Employment Labor Law, Massachusetts

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

Your boss is allowed to try to intimidate you into quitting, or make the work environment so unpleasant that you quit. He can have a co-worker present and make comments about you (with one limitation: if the frequency of your bowel movements is due to an actual medical condition--and you'd need a diagnosis or other medical support--they may be committing illegal disability-based discrimation or harassment, and you may have a legal claim; if you think this is the case, you should speak with an employment law attorney).

If you don't have a contract, your boss doesn't even need to try to get you quit--he can fire at any time, for any reason. Employees without contracts have almost no rights in or protection for their jobs; they are known as "employees at will."


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