What are my rights to the return of my personal property from work if I was terminated?

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What are my rights to the return of my personal property from work if I was terminated?

A male and female manager were sexually harassing me. I am not gay but the male manager would write notes or show me pics of him dressed in drag. The female manager would treat me rude until I acted like I would go out with her. After she realized that I was not serious, they both got together and set me up. We work from home most of the week. I live 8 minutes from the job. I went on my 15 minute break from home to go to a non-mandatory meeting. They lied and stated that I was late from work and logging in from home or an app. I was terminated for stealing company time which was untrue. Later, after the terminationm I sent an email to all of the executive leaders and they fired the male manager. I still have not received my belongings. They had me contact their lawyer but in almost a year I have not gotten one thing from my desk. My personal items were more than likely trashed. Also, I returned all of the company’s items such as their laptop and accessories but all I get is they are looking for them. What should I do at this point?

Asked on January 28, 2019 under Employment Labor Law, Georgia

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

You can sue for the value of your property--that's the only way to get any compensation for its loss, theft, or destruction. And unfortunately, you can only get its economic value: the law provides no compensation for sentimental or emotional value (e.g. of photographs or keepsakes). You would sue the company.


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