What arethe laws regarding a used car that was previously in an accident?

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What arethe laws regarding a used car that was previously in an accident?

I bought a used 7 months ago.  Approximately 2 weeks later the car was stuck in park. It ended up being a lamp switch (I believe it was called something like that). It was not covered under warranty so we had to pay $150 out of pocket. Then in 4 months ago it was raining an the car powered down while driving; it would only let you go about 20 mph. They looked at it but couldn’t find anything. Then we took it back for the same problem 2 months ago, and again they couldn’t find anything wrong. We have it in the shop now, was told it was in a front end collision and they have never seen so many damaged wires, which obviously is not covered under warranty.

Asked on February 7, 2011 under General Practice, Georgia

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Generally speaking, most states do not have used car lemon laws.  However, there are certain other laws that do help in this type of situation but it depends on whom you purchased the car from.  Was it a dealer?  You keep mentioning a warranty so I am thinking that it was from a dealer and had a warranty that was either still in effect or that was given you through the dealership.  If the dealership did not disclose the damage to the car then I believe that you have a very good case for fraud and misrepresentation.  Also, many states have laws regarding disclosure of the accident if the car was a salvage and title had been changed.  Call the state attorney general's office and then speak with an attorney.  Good luck to you.


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