If Iwas staying in a public housing facilityfor several monthsand was told to leave immediately, is this an illegal eviction?

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If Iwas staying in a public housing facilityfor several monthsand was told to leave immediately, is this an illegal eviction?

I was staying in a public housing facility with a friend for 3 months. However, my name is not on the lease. After getting into an argument with the head of the lease, I was told to leave the house immediately. I thought that I had to be evicted but the cops said the circumstance and policy were different and that I had to leave and was trespassed. Is this an illegal eviction?

Asked on October 29, 2010 under Real Estate Law, Florida

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

You here have admitted that you are not a tenant on the lease.  You mentioned nothing about paying rent.  You only stated that you were "staying with a friend" so one can assume that you were a guest and that at one point you were no longer wanted.  The laws vary on public housing but generally only those on the lease and family members (sometimes even limited to immediate family members) are permitted to live in the apartments.  Public housing has certain rules that are required in order to be able to live there. Did you think that you were a "subletter"?  That is probably a violation of the lease.  I think that if you feel differently you should go and seek help from an attorney in your area.   


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