What to do if I was served with a summons for credit card debt?

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What to do if I was served with a summons for credit card debt?

I have filed my answer both with the court and with their lawyer. I received a missed call today though from the plaintiff’s lawyer. They only left a message to call them back and that this is information from a debt collector. Should I call them back or wait until I see them at the court date which I have yet to receive?

Asked on December 17, 2012 under Bankruptcy Law, Michigan

Answers:

B.H.F., Member, Texas State Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Generally speaking, when someone is being sued, the communications go between the attorneys or attorney to party if the other side does not have an attorney.  If the debt collector is calling you, instead of the attorney, they may be doing so in an attempt to get a recording of you making some type of admission.   Instead of calling the debt collector back, call the court and ask to speak with the court coordinator.  They will be able to give you accurate information about when your case is set, if at all.  Some jurisdictions also offer online e-services where you can check on the status of your case whenever you have time.  If you want to talk to the other side about your case (like any potential settlements), then call the attorney.  The attorney's phone number should be listed on the pleadings that you received.  If for some odd reason it is not listed, the court coordinator or state bar will have the attorney's contact information.  If you continue to be contacted by attorneys and third party collectors regarding the same debt, you may want to visit with a consumer law attorney about filing a counterclaim for harrassing debt collection practices by employing the use of multiple debt collectors.


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