If I was recently divorced and represented myself in the divorce, can I request a change to the decree?

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If I was recently divorced and represented myself in the divorce, can I request a change to the decree?

I did not have the means to hire an attorney. I found out that my wife and her attorney were less than honest with me through the proceedings. In particular I would be asking to change custody from joint legal/physical to sole physical/joint legal. I would ask for provisions to be made concerning respecting religious affiliation, where the kids are to attend school, participate in sports, etc. It should be noted that the determination by FOC was that she was supposed to pay me child support. I waived that determination, and would continue to waive it.

Asked on March 30, 2012 under Family Law, Michigan

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

If you represented your self in a dissolution action where there is a final decree, you can make a request to change it. Whether or not your request will be honored depends upon what the basis is for the requested change and if there are new circumstances warranting the change. With respect to the custody of the children you can make the request, however if the request is less than six months after the prior order, unless there are compelling circumstances for the request, the chances of it getting approved is pretty slim based upon my experience.

I suggest that you consult with a family law attorney to assist you in your matter. If you cannot afford one, I suggest that you go to the nearest legal aid in your town for assistance.

 


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