How does uninsured motorist coverage work?

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How does uninsured motorist coverage work?

I was involved in a motorcycle accident about a month and a half ago. A van came over in to my lane, cutting me off, which forced me in to the other lane and go down. I sustained severe injuries, the motorcycle was totaled and the van never stopped. A friend said that this would fall under “Bodily Injury Uninisured Motorist”, which would cover my medical bills and pain/suffering. Is this true? My declaration page states under “BIUM” 30,000/60,000.

Asked on September 25, 2012 under Accident Law, Maryland

Answers:

Robert Slim / Robert C. Slim - Attorney at Law

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

UM coverage would apply if you know the identity of the other driver.  If you do not have the identity of the other driver, you must demonstrate that there was actual physical contact between your motorcycle and the van.  If you claim you were run off the road and there is no evidence of any physical contact between the vehicles, then your carrier will probably deny coverage for your losses under the UM coverage.

Gene Meltser, Esq. / BIRG & MELTSER

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

Yes it would but they may initially refuse if there was no contact with the van and they may want you to go under med pay for the bills.  However, they will definitely cover if ee prove that you were forced off the road. I would be glad to help. Please email me directly at [email protected]


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