What to do if I was injured by an electrical panel that had blown out on 3 other employees and suffered nerve damage that required surgery?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

What to do if I was injured by an electrical panel that had blown out on 3 other employees and suffered nerve damage that required surgery?

It was found that a compressor used to blow dust out of panel had been mistakenly injecting oil into the panel causing the explosions. I was recently terminated from my job for performance problems. The strange part – I was given a severance pack for 3 months pay and full medical along with signing a letter saying I would not sue. Nobody I know thinks it makes since. Should I sign the severance letter?

Asked on November 13, 2013 under Personal Injury, Georgia

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 7 years ago | Contributor

How badly were you injured? If you employer had been at fault (e.g. negligent or careless), which may have been the case from what you write, you could potetially recover the total of:

1) all out-of-pocket (i.e. not paid by insurance, like copays and deductibles) medical costs;

2) lost wages (if any--that is, if you missed any work due to the injury);

3) reduced future earning potential and projected future medical costs (if any); and

4) pain and suffering if you suffered significant disability or chronic pain for several months or more--while it's hard to put an exact dollar figure on this, if you entitled to it, you can roughly estimate it as an amount equal to your medical costs.

If you think the sum of the above is a few thousand dollars more than the amount of the severance, it may be worthwhile to bring legal action; if that may be the case, you should consult with an attorney about the situation in more detail.

 


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption