What are my rights if I was promised work full-time and then that there was no work for me?

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What are my rights if I was promised work full-time and then that there was no work for me?

It was verbally confirmed with me over 2 monyjs ago that my hours would be doubled and I would be given work for the following academic year in school. Then about a month ago I got a letter to confirm that my contract would be renewed and that they wanted to make me permanent. However now, my boss informed me that he was giving my hours to another new teacher who would be full-time. I was part-time and he felt making the time-table would be easier this way. I did nothing wrong. Now all schools are closed and it is too late to apply for another job for the beginning of the school year. Do I have any legal rights?

Asked on July 18, 2011 under Employment Labor Law, Alaska

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Yes, I think that you do.  I believe that there was an offer and an acceptance of a permanent position under basic contract law and that you should seek help from an employment attorney in your area as soon as you can.  The verbal agreements would possibly not hold up but the letter is confirmation that a deal was in place.  I am hoping that your "boss" is the principal or someone with authority to bind the school and the school district in hiring teachers.  You need to get moving on this as soon as you possible can. In the meantime you have the part time position but I really think that you are going to come put on top.  Good luck to you.  


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