If I was charged of petty theft but the charges were completely dismissed, how should I handle this when I complete my background check authorization?

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If I was charged of petty theft but the charges were completely dismissed, how should I handle this when I complete my background check authorization?

I am beginning classes for nursing very soon. I have been a background check will be conducted before I can begin clinicals. Will this interfere with my chances to begin clinicals and ultimately come back to haunt me when I take my state certification? Like I said, per checking my public record, all charges were dismissed and this was my first and only offense. No guilty plea was ever entered.

Asked on June 8, 2015 under Criminal Law, Virginia

Answers:

B.H.F., Member, Texas State Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 6 years ago | Contributor

If it was a dismissed charge, then it shouldn't affect you.  However, if it shows up on a background check, the nursing board may still do an inquiry and hold up your license simply because of the arrest-- until they are sure that this was a fluke and not a true representation of your character.

You need to know for sure what is on your history.  Instead of a "public record" search, you need to obtain a complete history.  What law enforcement and governmental entities see is frequently different than what the rest of the world sees.  You can request the complete search through your local law enforcement and sometimes your state's central data base.  Wouldn't hurt to do both.  From there, if it does show up, you can get with an attorney and have them help you file a motion for expunction to get this off your record before it becomes a major problem.


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