I want to turn over my personal property to my sister before I die. How do I do that?

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I want to turn over my personal property to my sister before I die. How do I do that?

We are both in California. I have had some heath issues and have become concerned
about making things earlier for her and for me. Can I write something simple up
or does everything I have have to be inventoried and a price given for each item?

Asked on February 8, 2019 under Estate Planning, California

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

Anything you don't need, you can simply give her now: if you anticipate that some other heir or relative may try to contest things later, send her an email (so the delivery date is automatically shown) saying something like "[Sister's name], as we discussed, I've given you my [insert brief list]. I know you did not have the chance to pick take these things when we spoke, but you can come by and get them whenever you want." If you give them to her while you are alive, they are hers; it's just good to have simple documentation of what you gave her, in the event of a challenge.
If you think you may or will need them, then instead simply will them to her. I can be as simple as "I leave all my personal property [if there are any exceptions, like a keepsake going to someone else, put them in here] to my sister [insert sister name]."


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