How doI get a bad debt of my ex-wife off of my credit report?

Get Legal Help Today

secured lock Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

How doI get a bad debt of my ex-wife off of my credit report?

I want to buy a home and but there’s a $20,000 debt showing up on my credit report (all3 bureaus). However it’s my ex-wife’s car debt. from a few years ago. We did jointly sign for it in 2004 but divorced in 2005; then it was repossessed 1 year later. Wouldn’t this debt be her debt? Can I just dispute this and get it off my credit so I can prove that I have enough credit to buy a home?

Asked on March 11, 2011 under Bankruptcy Law, Texas

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

What happened in your divorce does not effect outside parties.  Therefore, if your wife was responsible for the car loan and did not make the payments, you can sue her for any reimbursement for any of your out-of-pocket costs as a result (if any). However your joint creditor can take action against the both of you.  Accordingly, since you also signed for the loan, married or not, you are still legally responsible for it.  If payments were not made and the loan went into default, it is perfectly proper for your creditor to report this to the credit bureaus.  Bottom line, there really isn't any way to get this off of your report.  However, each credit reporting agency allows for an individual to make notations on their report as to any negative credit action taken against them.  In other words, you are given the opportunity to explain extenuating circumstances which will appear on your report next to any negative notations. 


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

secured lock Secured with SHA-256 Encryption