If I signed an employment contractbut then my employer stopped communicating with me, is this a breach of contract?

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If I signed an employment contractbut then my employer stopped communicating with me, is this a breach of contract?

I signed and employment agreement for overseas work. But they did not deploy me.First I received and signed a contingent offer of employment from the company which they accepted which was followed by all of the processing paperwork and a contractual agreement for employment. This, I completed and turned in also. Since I was already employed overseas with another company, they asked me to get a physical exam done before putting in my resignation and send the results to them for their clearing me to resign, return to the States, have another physical scheduled by them, and final processing for deployment. They stop communicating with me after my return. I don’t know why.

Asked on November 17, 2010 under Employment Labor Law, Illinois

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

I would suggest that you seek help from an employment attorney in your area on this matter.  Bring the contract with you.  It will need to be read and interpreted.  Doing it in this type of forum will not help you.  You seem to have a valid contract contingent upon certain items, like the physical. From what you have written may I ask: were you given "clearance" to resign from your old job before you did and came back to the United States?  Was that clearance verbal or was it in writing (even an e-mail would suffice here) as it can be seen as reliance. Seek legal help.  You are going to need some clout to get to the bottom of the matter.  Good luck. 


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