I SENT THE LETTER TO THEM WITH IT STATING TO CEASE AND DESIST.THEY STILL CALL ME.THE CREDIT CARD COMPANY JUST IGNORED THE LETTER.NOW WHAT?

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I SENT THE LETTER TO THEM WITH IT STATING TO CEASE AND DESIST.THEY STILL CALL ME.THE CREDIT CARD COMPANY JUST IGNORED THE LETTER.NOW WHAT?

Asked on June 20, 2009 under Employment Labor Law, Arizona

Answers:

S.J.H., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

A creditor with a valid claim can use various forms of collection techniques provided they obey State laws as well as the Fair Debt Collection Act which is federally regulated.  Usually the only thing you can demand of them is to cease calling your employment or other family members or neighbors and I suggest you do this in writing. They can call your home repeatedly during cetain hours and with some restrictions according to the specific law. If you wish them to stop calling you, you an hire an attorney for the limited purpose of having them stop calling you. Once a creditor is notified by an attorney to stop and desist direct contact the creditor must follow this directive or be subject to sanctions under the Fair Direct Collection Act. Usually when this happens, the creditor will either drop the issue for a while or go directly to suit at which time you may have to pay the lawyer additional monies to defend the suit.  Depending on the situation, sometimes it is best to just let them call your home and ignore them.  

MD, Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

I am sorry I don't have your entire story.  Is your creditor calling your job? Is that the question?

If so, please review the following:

https://www.freeadvice.com/legal/bankruptcy-law-category/debt-and-collections/fair-debt-collection-acts/


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