What to do if I rented a room in a house and paid both the deposit and rent for this month but have now changed my mind about moving in?

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What to do if I rented a room in a house and paid both the deposit and rent for this month but have now changed my mind about moving in?

There were no contracts in place or I did not tell the landlord for how long I was going to stay in his house. This was at the end of last month. A day after, a friend of mine told me I could come and stay with them and I wouldn’t have to pay rent, we could share. I’m still an intern so my interest was in getting a place that would be cost convenient. I did stay with my friend and I was supposed to be in my new room but I never went, not even for a single day. This Monday I called my landlord to explain the situation to him. When I called I told myself I’d only request refund on the deposit and leave the rent. However, he seems reluctant in giving my deposit back.

Asked on December 14, 2012 under Real Estate Law, Iowa

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

If you have no written lease in place for the unit that you have written about where you placed a deposit and one month's rent but have not moved in et, it would seem that under the laws of all states in this country that you need to write the person you have a contract with stating your intent and ask for the return of your money. Keep a copy of the letter for future use and need.


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