What will happen if I recorded a conversation with a proffessor of mine without his knowledge?

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What will happen if I recorded a conversation with a proffessor of mine without his knowledge?

During the conversation he made deragoratory, racist, and threatening statements direct towards me. At this point in time I am planning to complain about his behavior to the chair of his department. I fear that without this recording nobody will believe me regarding his extreme behavior since he is actually fairly highly regarded. He also happened to be a lawyer. How should I proceed, should I disclose my recording or should I keep it to myself? Any other advice on how I should proceed? Thanks for any advice in advance.The recording was made in a classroom without third party witnesses.

Asked on March 26, 2013 under Personal Injury, New York

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

New York is what is known as a one-party rule state.  That means that in New York the penal law makes it a crime to record an in person or telephone conversation unless at least one party consents.  One did.  That would be you.  So you are free of any criminal implications if that is what you are asking.  Now, as for the way the professor treated you you absolutely need to do something about it.  But I would have more than just the recording as evidence and I would seek help from a trusted person to help.  The professor is not stupid and there will never be any third party corroboration.  But you need to build your case here.  Possibly find others that this also happened to.  The recording is your topping on the cake here, so to speak.  Good luck. 


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