How to correct odometer paperwork?

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How to correct odometer paperwork?

I recently traded in a vehicle and while signing paperwork in a rush where many people were talking to me at the dealership, I failed to look closely at a few pages. The odometer paperwork states the car I traded in has 13,448 when I traded it in with over 74,000 miles on it. The dealership has also not posted payment to my current lien holder and I am getting collection calls on the traded in vehicle and they have already put the car up for sale online and given test drives. I don’t want to be liable or accused of turning back the odometer. The carfax now states odometer discrepancy and I do not want to be help accountable. Is there any way to correct this?

Asked on September 12, 2012 under General Practice, New Jersey

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Given the situation that you have now found yourself in with respect to the improper designation of the odometer of the car that you traded in, the following are ways for you to try and get the proper paperwork in order:

1. go to the dealership where you traded in the car and complete new paperwork showing the correct mileage of the car that you traded in and make sure such is submitted to your state's department of motor vehicles;

2. if the dealership will not assist you, go to your state's department of motor vehicles to fill out and submit the proper paperwork regarding the car you traded in;

3. if option # 2 does not help, consult with an attorney that practices in the area of automotive law to assist you in your endeavor.


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