What will happen if I go to turn myself in?

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What will happen if I go to turn myself in?

I recently received a letter in the mail from the police department in my college town.I “…currently has on file a warrant for your arrest charging you with the following: possess/consume alcohol by minor prohibited…it is imperative that you turn yourself in at your earliest opportunity…” What exactly is this saying? This must be referring to an incident several months ago in which I drank too much at a party and my friends had to take me to the hospital. I am 18 years old and live out of state. This is my first offense. What is the best way for me to get charges dropped or expunged?

Asked on June 6, 2013 under Criminal Law, Delaware

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

Quite frankly, you really should consiult with a criminal alw attorney as to this. Find one that praactices n the are of where you were arrested. They will have contact withing the local court sysytem that they can use to your advantage. Even if you cannot afford one to represent you in court, at least go over your situation with one. An hour or so of their time will be well worth it. Also, check to see if you are income eligible to be appointed a Public Defender. That fact is that any time criminal charges are involved it is highly adviseable to have legal representation.


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