What to do if I recently ran my credit report and it indicates that I have student loans that I co-signed for but I did not.

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What to do if I recently ran my credit report and it indicates that I have student loans that I co-signed for but I did not.

I have a former roommate back in college that I was friends with who had used my information on some student loans. He stated that he removed my information from the loans 3 years ago and he has provided letters from the IDAPP indicating this. I have attempted to contact IDAPP but they advised me that they can not tell me if the letters are fake or real. I had sent the copies of the letters to IDAPP to find out if they are fake or real but no response. I also sent these letters to the credit bureaus. I need some advice on what I can do at this point to remove my name?

Asked on April 20, 2012 under Bankruptcy Law, Illinois

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

If you are concerned that you are improperly named as a co-signer with respect to student loans referenced on a credit report pertaining to you that you did not sign for, you need to send a letter to the credit reporting agencies showing such information and the creditor stating stating that you never signed any such loans as a co-signer and ask for copies of all documents with your supposed name on it.

Keep a copy of the letters for future reference. Make sure you ask for such information by a set date. I would keep pressing them until you get a response that you desire. If not, you need to consult with an attorney that practices in the area of consumer law to assist you further.


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