What to do if I received a phone call from a police officer saying that I had been identified in video surveillance damaging a car which he called criminal damage?

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What to do if I received a phone call from a police officer saying that I had been identified in video surveillance damaging a car which he called criminal damage?

He asked where I was that night and I gave a reasonable alibi and a friend to call and secure/support that alibi. However, I was incredibly drunk and have no idea what I did that night. Literally none. I denied damaging the car over the phone and then he asked me if I would be willing to do a polygraph test. I said maybe, and then he said that an appointment would be set up for the polygraph test. I think that I will say no to taking the polygraph test when they call again. Would that be wise? What should I do in this situation? I am 18 and in college.

Asked on June 6, 2014 under Criminal Law, Illinois

Answers:

Richard Southard / Law Office of Richard Southard

Answered 6 years ago | Contributor

You should hire an experienced criminal defense attorney who hopefully will protect your rights and prevent you from posting some pretty damning admissions on public websites.  Your fact pattern is specific enough that it can be used against you.  You have a 5th Amendment right not to incriminate yourself and not to answer any questions by the police. Exercise that right and hire an attorney to help you undo the damage you have already done.


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